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Artikels Keith Wassung


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The Locust

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vreem dat hij daar post... misschien een poging om tegengewicht te bieden voor al de nonsens die daar verteld wordt ;)
 

GoHeavyLifter

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idd, kvond het ook al vreemd :), nouja, heb het ook maar even gevonden met google...
 

The Locust

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normaal post hij regelmatig op "power and bulk", een zeer goed forum trouwens dat ik vaak raadpleeg. Een paar sterke gasten posten daar, o.a. ook soms Bud Jeffries. Maar zoals gezegd, sinds de ez-board crash is zowat al hun info weg, maar nu zijn ze ze een volledig nieuw board begonnen.

(http://powerandbulk.com/phpBB2/index.php)
 

The Locust

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right on..... :

"I dont care how a workout makes you feel, how pumped you get, how much your thighs burned, etc. if you are not adding weight and reps to the exercise over a period of time then you will make little if any progress. My first recorded squat workout was 65lbs for eight reps and it was hard and heavy. A little over thirteen years later, I did 600 for eight reps and it was just as hard and heavy."
 

GoHeavyLifter

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update

kijk in de bovenste post, er staan er nog enkele nieuwe bij! :)
 

The Locust

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thanx. Die "lessons learned" had ik nog niet gelezen, van de rest had ik al kunnen genieten op het oude P&B. Ben blij dat je ze elders terug hebt kunnen oprakelen. :thumb: Kga ze allemaal uitprinten.
 

MonsterStrength

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I advocate the full barbell squat as one of the core exercises in most any weight-training program. If you are an aspiring powerlifter, then you will need to spend some time performing squats in a powerlifting style in order to prepare for competition. I believe that the full squat will be of tremendous value in laying down a proper strength foundation.

Many fitness experts warn against performing squats past the point of parallel for fear of potentially damaging the knees. As a general rule I disagree with those experts though there are certainly individual exceptions. When the full squat is performed correctly and with total control through a complete range of motion, the knees are strengthened, not weakened. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, an estimated 50 million North Americans have suffered or are suffering knee pain or injuries and six million of them will visit a doctor for knee problems each year. The majority of these problems are degenerative in nature and are the result of disuse of the knee joint. Squatting keeps the knee joints mobile and free of pain. Several joint facets on the inside of the kneecap are used only when an individual performs a complete squat.

When the squat is performed to a parallel depth, it is the knees, which take the majority of the stress involved in stopping the downward momentum of the squat. When the squat is performed to a full depth, this same ?braking? stress is transferred to the larger, powerful muscles of the hips, hamstrings and buttocks. It is obvious that the squat must be performed with a great deal of control and that any type of rapid ?rebounding?, whether it is done at parallel or at full depth will be detrimental to the knees.

It is common for someone who does full squats for the first time to complain of "knee pain", but anytime you impose stress on a part of the body that has not been used much, then some discomfort will follow initially. In the Western world, we are not used to squatting, but in many places it is part of daily life.

I also believe that if you have been lifting and do parallel type squats and wish to go deeper, you should spend a few weeks or training sessions doing bodyweight type full squats to get the facet joints used to this new range of motion and then you can gradually add weight.

Hope that helps

Keith
 

MonsterStrength

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Bodybuilding: now and then

I picked up my first bodybuilding magazine in the winter of 1979. Back then you had to either subscribe to them or get them from a gym or a health food store. Most grocery stores, drug stores, etc. did not carry such publications, at least now where I grew up. A lot has changed since then, some things for the good, some for the worse. I dont wish to start a thread bashing either the past or the present, but rather to compare and contrast each era and hopefully others will add their comments as well.

The champions of now are far bigger and far more ripped than champions of the past. The physiques of the past seemed more distinct with each of the champions having "signature" poses. In some of the magazines of the past, they would have silhouttes of the champions and you would have to guess who each was. It was not hard to do. I think that the present champions lack the individual physique distinction and tend to all look similar. Now this could be because I do not follow the sport quite as intensely as I did as a young man, but I still know all the names.

I liked it when all of the championship contests were designated by "Mister" titles, such as Mr. America, Mr. Universe, etc. Changing the names to National and World Champion were done, likely to improve the image of the sport in hopes of making it more mainstream. I also liked it when the amateur contests has best bodyparts.

Danny Padilla still has one of the greatest physiques I have ever seen in my life.

The black and white photos of Dorian Yates in black socks are the most impressive photos I have ever seen.

Tom Platz's legs are the most impressive bodypart I have ever seen on any bodybuilder.

Having a bantamweight class in a bodybuilding championship is like having a superheavyweight jockey division in horse racing.

The first contest I ever judged was at a large state prison. I was there to do a lifting exhibition before the bodybuilding event and then to be part one of the judges. I had no experience in this. The head judge, who was a veteran pulled all five of the judges together and gave us our instructions: He said "ladies and gentlemen ( there was one lady present) the winner will be the person who you believe has the most physically impressive body" pretty simple and that is how I have always judged bodybuilding contests since then. Not the biggest, the most ripped, not the most symmetrical-but the most impressive.

Modern bodybuilding needs to return to the days when the posing suit is a lot more modest, rather than a borderline g-string.

I wish Kal Szkalak, 1977 Mr. U had competed for a few more years.
 

MonsterStrength

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The Value of Worthless Exercises

My winter years in high school largely consisted of doing chores around the farm at 5am in thirty degree below temperatures and wrestling. Our high school had a great wrestling tradition. I was always paired up with Butch, who was one weight class lighter than I. Butch did not know the meaning of the word quit. Actually there were a lot of words that Butch did not know the meaning of. I have always suspected that he was too dumb to know that he was tired. During the previous football season we were on a road game and during warm-ups, Butch told the coach that he had forgotten his mouthpiece. One of the trainers had a mouthpiece in the training bag and she went and found a microwave to heat the water in order to form the mouthpiece. They brought the cup of hot water and the mouthpiece out to Butch only to discover that he did have a mouthpiece after all. The coach asked him where he had found his mouthpiece and Butch replied that he had found an old discarded one at the edge of the field and had popped it into his mouth.

Our practices were about two and half hours long and they always ended the same way. During the last fifteen minutes of practice, our coaches would divide us up into two teams and we would have some sort of competition. Usually, it consisted of relay race involving crabwalks, wheelbarrows or two-man carries. If the basketball court was empty, we would occasionally play a fast game of basketball, which always seemed to degenerate into dodge ball.

Did the coaches have us engage in these competitions in order to perfect our wrestling skill-not really. Did it improve our balance or conditioning?- Nope. Then why did we do it? Because it was fun. We looked forward to it, we had fun and it allowed us to end a hard practice on an up-beat note.

Often times certain exercises are deemed "worthless" by other people. These would include, but are not limited to the tricep kickback, concentration curls and the classic worthless exercise, the cable crossover. First of all, can any exercise really be considered worthless? It might be dangerous, especially when performed incorrectly, and it may have a very low productivity factor, but it can hardly be considered worthless. The same people who claim these are worthless exercises will then advise you not to do them, because they will cut into you recuperation. Wait a minute, if the exercise is worthless, then how can it affect your recuperation?

Now allow me to make a very important point. There are literally millions of people who perform these "worthless" exercises exclusively. You see them in the gyms and health clubs day in and day out pumping away on the easiest movements they can find. Those people are fooling themselves and they are not the type of people reading this article. I believe that lifting is all about getting bigger and stronger and this only occurs when you work the basic compound movements in a progressive manner. I believe you could probably pick two or three basic exercises and if that was all you ever did, you would be one strong and well built individual. But I also realize that doing those movements over and over would eventually get a little boring, so it's important to do some additional stuff now and then, even if it does not add a lot to your main objectives.

One of the first internet training articles that I ever wrote was about shoulder development. My program consisted largely of overhead presses, but I also mentioned that at the end of the workout, I did a couple of sets of lateral raises. I received countless numbers of e-mails from guys who could not believe that I would do lateral raises. I even came across a discussion forum where people were debating the reason why I did lateral raises. Some proposed the theory that it helped build the medial deltoid, which aided my overhead presses, others claimed it was for the rotator cuff and most simply said that I was crazy for doing it. They were all wrong, I do them because I like doing them and for no other reason and I could care less what other people think.

One of the essential keys to longevity in lifting is to have a certain amount of fun in your training. When you get to the point where you dread going to the gym or see it as simply something that you have to do, but really don't want to do, then it is only a matter of time until you will quit altogether. When I was in high school and in the military, I knew a lot of guys who began a lifting program with great enthusiasm. The bought all of the books, went to the seminars, trained hard and made noteworthy gains. Twenty years later, I do not know a single one of those guys who trains. They can claim they don't have time, but they have time to golf, fish, and watch sports. My entire weekly training takes less time that a weekly episode of Monday Night Football. People quit lifting for the most part, because they stopped having fun with their training.

Do what you have to do in order to have fun in your training, even if it means doing some of those worthless exercises.


Keith Wassung
 

Azrael

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Goed spul! Ik ga het zeker doorlezen. Het zag er zeer goed uit allemaal!
 

MonsterStrength

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Vooral die laatste die ik gepost hebt vind ik zeer goed, gewoon "waardeloze" oefeningen doen omdat je graag doet is op termijn beter dan een "goede" oefening veel te doen, maar met veel tegenzin
 

Azrael

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Ik vind zijn artikel over "Goalsetting" interresant vooral. Heb hem met plezier gelezen en ga er eens wat mee doen.
 

The Locust

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Ik heb vroeger heel veel vooruitgang geboekt met het soort total-tonnage programma dat hij beschrijft in zijn bench-press artikel. Alleen deed ik een 8-5-3 sequentie, faillure op 10reps lag me namelijk niet zo goed. Ik vraag me eigenlijk af waarom ik ooit op iets anders ben overgeschakeld, want m'n bench is daarna lange tijd blijven hangen. **** it, ik ga weer beginnen benchen zoals de Keith.
 

patkrachtser

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waar komt die total tonnage op neer (in het kort) ja je kan ook zeggen lees het artikel.
maar uw ervaring wil ik wel weten, wat is het en welke vordering heb je gemaakt ?
 

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