XXL Nutrition

Creatine slecht?


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Gebru1ker

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http://news.brown.edu/articles/2015/04/muscles

Ik zit dit net te lezen en hier wordt beweerd dat een causaal verband is tussen het gebruik van creatine/bodybuilding supplementen en teelbalkanker. Weten jullie hier meer over en hebben jullie andere studies gelezen?

Ik had een uur geleden nog een potje creatine besteld op xxlnutrition :(

mvg Oli
 

bricone

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damn man, zal het maar niet gebruiken als ik jou was, dit wil je niet.

ps. stuur de pot maar naar mij.
 

Niemandweet

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Er staat "powders with creatine", dus lijkt me dat onderzoek gaat over van die supplementen waarin creatine wordt gemixd (meestal oplichterij omdat creatine dan enige echte werkende bestandsdeel is). Dus misschien creatine zelf niet.
 

Gingerbreadman

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Dat is alleen bij de creatine van Body en Fitshop.
 

polotraxx

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enkel bij injecteerbare creatine. Zien dat je een goede pct doet voorkomt al veel van de problemen!
notsrs
 

Big-T

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Reactie van Examine.com:


Studies like these do not prove a causal relationship (taking X causes Y). Instead, they reveal a potential connection, which further research must investigate in order to determine what causes this potential relationship.

As such, this study should not be used as evidence to prove anything. Instead, it acts as a stepping stone to more in depth research.

Specifically, the article stated that “The interview included an assessment of 30 different types of MBS powders or pills. The major ingredients, including creatine, protein, and androstenedione or its booster, were abstracted according to the product ingredients.”

The researchers also specified that the ingredients were abstracted, or taken at the word of the label. If the label claimed there was androstenedione in the supplement, the authors assumed it was true. There was no mention of analyzing the supplements to confirm this. Confounding ingredients or ‘hidden’ ingredients (those not disclosed on the label) do not seem to be accounted for. This is particularly relevant in the context of the recent revelations of poor supplement quality in the industry.

Ultimately, this study does not offer enough evidence for current MBS users to change their supplementing habits at all. However, this kind of study will spark interest in the topic of MBS and testicular cancer, spur more research and hopefully, result in a better questionnaire that can be used to predict relative risk of various cancers.

This study does not provide practical evidence to answer the question, on a personal level, “will this supplement I’m using give me testicular cancer?” It is, however, always a good idea to look up each ingredient in your dietary supplement in Examine.com’s database to see if any provide individual cause for concern. For example, you can see that the body of existing research finds creatine to be safe.

At this moment in time, there is no reason to fear ‘muscle building supplements’ as a group.

http://examine.com/blog/do-muscle-b...est-study-on-mbs-usage-and-testicular-cancer/
 

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