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Fitness Fact Or Fiction: Does Slow Lifting Produce Better Results?

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3XL

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Fitness Fact Or Fiction: Does Slow Lifting Produce Better Results?
A few years ago I saw a fitness guru on television preaching the benefits of super slow repetitions. He even went so far as to say that just ONE set of slow reps performed to failure was the equivalent of multiple traditional rep sets!

So what gives? Is slow lifting a better way to get results?

First off let me say that NO, one set of slow reps is NOT the equivalent of multiple sets. It can’t be as with every set more muscle motor units are called upon which eventually leads to muscle exhaustion. You simply cannot tire a muscle fully with just one set, especially a slow set. And in truth the type of muscle fiber that gets trained with slow reps may not be the ones you’re looking to grow. Let me explain.

Have you ever heard of T.U.T.? It stands for Time Under Tension and it’s a well-known training variable that’s been used in trainee’s programs for decades. Simply put, lifting a weight slowly as opposed to using a normal or even fast speed is harder – a lot harder. In fact when done correctly you may have to cut your working weight in half to keep good form. There are a couple of reasons for this. One, you lose any and all momentum during the movement so you’ll really feel the muscles work and two, you’ll be calling upon more endurance or slow twitch muscle fibers which are generally weaker. There is a theory that says as the sets progress with slow training that more fast twitch fibers are called upon, but I’m not sure about that. Here’s why…



Fast twitch fibers have little endurance and are responsible for explosive strength and power output. To say that as the slow set progresses and the endurance fibers tire that more fast twitch fibers will have to help out is a bit of a stretch I think – at least for the average trainee. Perhaps in a clinical setting under strict guidelines and with slow, multiple sets performed to absolute failure this may be the case. But I don’t see many individuals in the gym pushing themselves to the brink of their physical limits. We all know that explosive movements like plyometric jumps and exercises performed with a fast and explosive, yet controlled rep speed build more strength and muscle size as fast twitch fibers have a better ability to grow. Plus I have to be honest – slow lifting is often times boring. Have you ever tried a super slow set of bench presses, pushups or even squats? It’s painful – both mentally and physically.

Now with that said there is a place in your routine for varied rep speeds. I’ll be honest and say that I usually follow a protocol of ‘under control’ when performing traditional lifts. I make sure I’m moving the weight, not the momentum and that I feel my muscles working with correct form. Oftentimes within a given workout I may do both and start the heavier sets with a faster speed and then slow down as I strip off weight. But when I’m performing a Crossfit type workout it’s a different story. Crossfit asks you to go as fast as you can, safely, correctly and at your threshold for intensity. So in those workouts I try to blaze through the movements with correct and full range of motion form. And last time I looked, the Crossfit athletes weren’t lacking in the muscle or strength department. I find the best use for slow rep speed is when I don’t want to go heavy and need a lighter day. Slowing down the rep speed is a great way to change up your routine and make the muscles work in a different way. As always variety is key!

Do slow reps produce better results? Total Fiction – but they CAN have a place in your program.

http://www.angrytrainerfitness.com/...ion-does-slow-lifting-produce-better-results/
 

Big-T

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"Now with that said there is a place in your routine for varied rep speeds. I’ll be honest and say that I usually follow a protocol of ‘under control’ when performing traditional lifts. I make sure I’m moving the weight, not the momentum and that I feel my muscles working with correct form. Oftentimes within a given workout I may do both and start the heavier sets with a faster speed and then slow down as I strip off weight."

+1. Echt de nadruk leggen op langzaam heeft weinig nut.
 

Eomer

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Kan me ook prima in dit artikel vinden. Echt de nadruk op langzaam leggen heeft imo ook weinig nut, maar ze af en toe gebruiken om te varieren vind ik wel zinvol.
 

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