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Sticky Gear vs raw training

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Sanca Saxon

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Omdat er buiten RAW (enkel gebruik van een belt en knee/wristsleeves) wedstrijden er ook veel powerlifting wedstrijden georganiseerd worden met Gear (suits en wraps) een kleine uiteenzetting

Gear vs Raw Training

Powerlifting gear was first introduced into the sport in the early 1970s. Prior to the use and advancement of gear, the use of tight jean shorts, ace bandages, and whatever a lifter could think of was used for support. Over the past four decades gear has advanced and continues to offer the sport several different options: raw, raw with wraps, single-ply, and multi-ply.

There are several misconceptions surrounding raw and multi-ply. These usually involve the economics of the sport and an overall lack of understanding of how the body functions. This also includes some very basic biomechanics and physiology concepts.

I’ve had numerous multi-ply lifters who have placed very well in raw meets. However, they were all extremely surprised and shocked when they first came out of gear. They were shocked at how weak they had become. A few expressed to me that they spent the last five years training and actually got weaker. This is far from the case. I have also read these same stories countless times online as they are all based around the same concept of, “I couldn’t” believe how weak I was when I removed the gear.”

One important factor to keep in mind is within one year they were all breaking raw records.

To further illustrate this phenomenon, a 500-pound raw lifter decides to train and compete in multi-ply and over the next five years increases his squat up to 800 pounds with gear. At this point he decided to compete raw and begin the next training cycle, only to find out he can only squat 450. Therefore the lifter believes he was stronger before he ever got into gear. However, he sticks with it and by the end of 12 months, this results in squatting 600 pounds raw. In their mind they went from a very hard 450 to a 600 raw. Yes, this is great progress, but it’s not all due to what they think it is. It is VERY hard for anyone to increase a raw squat by 150 pounds, especially someone who has been training for over a decade.

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Let’s examine this more thoroughly. Gear does help. Anyone who say’s different is a liar. Gear also aids in other aspects as well. It enhances the strength curve. Note: I didn’t say it changes the strength curve. To fully understand this, search YouTube for missed lifts and you will find the majority of the time raw and geared lifters miss at the same points. It is a misconception that raw lifters miss in the hole and off their chest and that multi-ply lifters miss at the top. Lifters miss due to their weak points and, in most cases, are typically weak a few inches coming out of the bottom of the squat and the top third of the bench press—regardless of gear or no gear.

In addition, gear also provides more feedback loops for a lifter compared to a raw lifter. When wearing gear, you have the tension of the suit providing feedback for body position. You can feel if your knees are not out by the sensation of the suit within the sides of your legs. You can feel if you are arching hard enough by the tension in the ass. You can tell when you are getting close to parallel due to the overall tension the suit creates on your body.

In the bench, you can tell when to tuck by how the shirt is pulling on the elbows. You can feel the path of the bar based on how the shirt is pulling across the chest and triceps. You can tell when to turn the elbows out by when the shirt begins to let go.



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For the deadlift, you learn where to place your hips at the start, based on the pull of the straps and the pull up through the crotch. All of these (and ones I left out) all provide neural feedback loops during the beginning, which are conscious and subconscious for the more geared and skilled lifters. This changes the intramuscular and neuromuscular coordination of the lift as well as the synchronization of how the lift is performed. The lift becomes more technical and the lifter needs to approach the training more carefully to maximize this effect. This is why someone can’t just toss gear on and get 200 pounds out of it. If most people threw gear on they would get very little out of it, as the return on investment would be minimal. You need to “learn the skill” or become more “efficient” at using it (both on the muscular and neuromuscular level). Over time this skill is learned and thus can become mastered for some lifters. While their lifts do increase, so does their strength.

Going back to the example of the 500-pound raw squatter who goes into gear and squats 800 within vie years. Their gains were NOT completely contributed due to gear. They also got stronger.

What happens when they remove the gear is the body has to relearn motor patterns without the feedback loops. This is why they feel so weak the first time they squat raw. Their body (and mind) is looking for feedback, and it’s not receiving it. To reestablish the feedback loops takes time and repetition. When the feedback loops are reestablished (based only on kinesthetic awareness and body position) their strength begins to rapidly increase. This ISN’T new strength; it is strength they previously developed, but they were not technically efficient to properly demonstrate it.

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In contrast, it takes time for a newly geared lifter to recognize the feedback loops required to lift in gear. Once these are restored, they will only see a modest increase in their lifts, despite what the critics say. They will not get 300 pounds out of their shirt or 500 pounds out of a squat suit. This takes time and it also requires getting stronger. Despite what you may hear about these huge carryovers, they are not entirely true because the more efficient one becomes with gear, the less efficient they will be without it. It is VERY difficult for your body to become extremely efficient raw and in gear at the same time because of the neuromuscular aspects previously discussed. Therefore, when someone says they get 350 pounds out of a shirt, I am willing to bet if they removed the shirt and trained raw for 8 months they would restore these feedback loops and be able to bench 100 pounds or more.

The take away for advanced lifters is to understand that if you go into gear, raw or single-ply, there will be an adjustment period. From my experience and years of training and coaching, this is usually between 6-8 months. Do not attempt to rush this process. While technical skill development and repetition is important, it’s more critical to ensure quality repetition.

Bron: http://www.elitefts.com/education/training/powerlifting/gear-vs-raw-training-minus-bro-science/

10 rules to getting great in gear

10. Build a base. You should have at least 5 years of training before suits and shirts even cross your mind.

9. Train like a bodybuilder. Make every muscle strong.

8. Eat right. I’m sick of looking at fat ass powerlifters sticking their fat asses in gear. The top level lifters don’t shove McDonald’s down their throats 3 times a day.

7. Do accessory work. This kinda goes along with the bodybuilding one, but I’ve trained for twenty years and I still do leg presses, hack squats, dumbell presses, and flies.

6. Quit following other peoples routines. Figure out what works for you. At the same time listen to stronger people.

5. It doesn’t matter what kind of shirt Kennelly is wearing. He would be stronger in a trash bag then you in a triple ply Inzer Fury Rage Quad Seemed Dynamic Stiched Poly Shirt.

4. Do full range movements. The top level guys doing board presses in a shirt already know how to touch. I have watched countless board press heroes blow it at meets.

3. Train your abs hard. I’m unsure when people started to believe that abs weren’t important in powerlifting. If you’re ever standing up with a thousand pounds, you will thank me.

2. Bands, chains and boxes are awesome tools, but you can learn how to manipulate them. Bands stabilize lifts and boxes will stop you. This doesn’t happen with real weight.

1. Start your powerlifting journey at a commercial gym. Stay in the power rack and with dumbells. Things like deadlift bars and monolifts make stuff way easier. This was probably the most important thing I ever did. I got really strong using minimal equipment. It will make a powerlifting gym that much better.

Bron: http://www.jtsstrength.com/articles/2013/05/21/10-rules-to-getting-great-in-gear/

Suits, Shirts, Wraps, and Sleeves: A Quick Tutorial on Powerlifting Gear
Devin Harper
Coach


Because weight lifting is such a strenuous sport, powerlifters and bodybuilders often use special wraps and uniforms for support. Pushing heavy weight puts a tremendous amount of pressure on your body's joints, and one way to avoid injury in the gym is through the use of powerlifting gear. So today I'm going to get into the different types of powerlifting gear and talk about how to use them to your advantage.



Types of Powerlifting Gear

There are several types of gear specifically designed to help lifters take it to the next level. I've broken them down into two categories. First we will look at the various types of suits and shirts, then we will examine wraps and sleeves.

Squat Suits, Bench Shirts, and Deadlift Suits



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Powerlifting uniforms help keep lifters safe during squat, bench press, and deadlift exercises by compressing the body and keeping the hips aligned. These suits are built to do one thing and one thing only - create an uncomfortably tight fit. While they are uncomfortable to wear, they are well worth it if your goal is to push more weight and do so safely.

Having said that, an athlete must bear in mind the different rules and regulations of competitive lifting. Avoid regularly lifting in uniforms if you are preparing to compete in a 100% Raw Powerlifting Federation meet, for example.

If the powerlifting federation you're competing in allows uniforms, then it's important to note that your competitors will likely be training in uniforms, therefore, you need to be training in uniforms or they will have an advantage. Anyone who has ever put one on knows that they take some getting used to.

Make sure your uniform is the right fit for your body. Do this by measuring around your arms, chest, waist, and thighs to find the appropriate size. As a general rule of thumb, the tighter you can get it, the better. In fact, it should require the assistance of someone to get it on, but not so tight that the suit limits your range of motion.

Squat Suits

Squat suits look like a regular one-piece singlet, but they're far from ordinary. They have very sturdy seams and sport a double- or triple-ply design that makes them ultra durable. Squat suits are designed to amplify your stretch reflex at the bottom of your squat. The more your stretch reflex is amplified, the more power you will be able to generate. While squat suits will help you lift more, some lifters experience more carryover than others (100-200 lbs vs 20-50 lbs more), depending on their form and whether or not their suit fitted correctly.



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Bench Shirts



Bench shirts can be made out of a variety of materials, including polyester, denim, and canvas. They come in varying thickness and offer support thanks to built in elastic properties. When you put on a bench shirt, it makes your arms naturally want to be out in front of you. The shirt compresses the chest and arms, and as a result, it offers more resistance to the eccentric phase of your lift. This added support makes the bench shirt a must when it comes to maximum bench press attempts.


Deadlift Suits

Deadlift suits look and function similarly to squat suits, but they feature different stitching and flare in the legs that is designed uniquely for the deadlift exercise. Because powerlifting uniforms can be expensive, some lifters use a squat suit for both the squat and the deadlift exercises. Both the squat suit and deadlift suits offer resistance to the eccentric phases of your lift and help you push through the sticky points of heavy lifts.


Knee Wraps, Knee Sleeves & Wrist Wraps


When properly used, powerlifting wraps and sleeves can dramatically improve knee safety when lifting heavy weight. Additionally, they can help you lift 5 to 10 percent more weight.

Knee Wraps

Knee wraps are long, heavy wraps that stretch out to about twenty feet. They are designed to be strategically wrapped around knees to absorb stress. Every lifter has a special way of knee wrapping, but the basic guidelines can be found here:

Knee Sleeves

Knee sleeves feature strong, bonded fabric and are made of neoprene to fit snugly and stay in place during use. Avoid making a habit of always wearing knee protection. Otherwise, the tissues in your knees may not develop as strong as they ought to be.

Wrist Wraps


Wrist wraps are one of the most cost-effective pieces of powerlifting gear out there. They can be used for bench press, heavy dumbbells, and any other heavy lifting exercise that requires extra wrist support. However, wrist wraps should not replace forearm workouts. The purpose of wrist wraps is to compress your wrists and provide support, not necessarily make them stronger.

Summary

If you want to move more weight, get stronger faster and protect your body (NOTE: powerlifting gear dient niet ter preventie van blessures, zeker niet gezien het feit je in gear doorgaans met (veel) zwaardere gewichten aan de slag gaat) , then invest in powerlifting gear. Uniforms and wraps like the ones mentioned above will help you reach new heights in the gym and attain personal goals.

Bron: http://breakingmuscle.com/strength-...sleeves-a-quick-tutorial-on-powerlifting-gear


Weightlifting Belts – Should you use one? Pro’s and Con’s

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The use of weightlifting belts used to be limited to Olympic lifters and Powerlifting, however in recent years they have become much more widespread and now even people completely new to lifting are using them. Are they really necessary? And if so, what are the correct uses and are there any dangers?

Belts serve two main purposes. They reduce stress on the lower back when lifting in an upright position and help to prevent hyperextension when pressing overhead. A lot of people assume that the belt supports their back, however the actual point of the belt is to increase intra-abdominal pressure which help stabilise the abdomen. For this purpose the best one is a powerlifting type belt which is the same width all the way round. If you are using a belt with a thinner front section, my advice would be to wear it backwards so you can use it as intended.

How to wear it – The correct placing of the belt varies from person to person depending on their own body structure, but as a guide it should be worn around the small of your back and lower abdomen. You want it fairly low, but not so it pushes into your hips/pelvis at the bottom of a squat or deadlift. You want it fairly tight, but as your aiming to push your abs into it, my recommendation is to go for one notch looser than full tightness. This will also make it easier to remove after your set!

How to use it – In order to increase the intra-abdominal pressure, it is important to use the Valsava maneuver. Take a big breath into your belly (not diaphragm/chest), and push your stomach as hard as possible into the belt. Imagine your trying to blow out as hard as possible but with a closed mouth/throat. This pressure against the belt will then provide support around the whole midsection and feel nice and stable. If your belt is done up too tight (see previous point), you will struggle to get a big enough gulp of air into your belly as it’s already being restricted.

When to use it – I personally don’t advise using a belt for every exercise or even for every set of the big lifts. In order to increase your own core stability, you need your lower back and abs to function normally. Try and save the use of the belt for max effort sets only. Correctly performed squats, deadlifts, etc .. work your abdomen and lower back harder than any specific core-type training, especially under heavy load so do yourself a favour, skip the sit-ups and practice your main lifts. I’m not saying you shouldn’t train your abs, but remember the main purpose of your core is to stabilise the spine. When under load this is an absolute necessity, if you use a belt every set, you won’t increase your own strength & stability around the middle and may be more at risk of injury due to muscular imbalances. On top of that, when you do decide to lift without one, you will feel very weak and unstable.

Pro’s of belt use:

  • Increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) to support spine
  • Prevent hyper-extension of the lumbar spine
  • Increased stability during main lifts
  • Allows heavier weights to be used
  • Reduced spinal shrinkage (lower back compression) due to increased IAP
Con’s of belt use:

  • Inhibited motor recruitment patterns
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Injuries can be more severe – due in part to heavier loads being used
  • Will not make up for bad technique
  • Weaker core (if used excessively)

In summary, belts are not necessary for most types of weight training in which the spinal erectors don’t work against heavy resistance – i.e. machine work or isolation exercises like bicep curls or lat raises. They can be used for heavy compound lifts, but I recommend only on max effort sets. Anyone with blood pressure problems or heart conditions should use them sparingly, if at all.

Most importantly – Do some research! don’t just throw on a belt because your mate/training partner tells you to, or you’ve read it in some forum somewhere. Read up on what they’re for and why to use them!

Bron: https://behench.com/2013/01/14/weightlifting-belts-should-you-use-one-pros-and-cons/comment-page-1/
 
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rob91

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Mooi stukje, heb geared lifting altijd al boeiend gevonden. Denk niet dat ik het ooit zal doen, ik train nog maar 2 jaar en heb ook totaal geen wedstrijd ambities, daar ben ik veel te slap voor. Daarnaast, geared lifting zie ik eigenlijk nooit bij de jonge dudes op youtube. Beetje uitgestorven tak van de sport denk ik.

Wist trouwens niet dat altijd knee sleeves dragen met trainen slecht is voor de ontwikkeling van je kniegewricht. Draag die dingen altijd, puur omdat mijn knie anders niet stabiel en veilig aanvoelt. Misschien op de lichtere dagen vanaf nu uitlaten en ben benieuwd of ik sterkere knieen krijg daarvan. Zo zal het ook werken met een belt, maar gek genoeg wordt de belt niet eens behandeld in dit stukje.

Wellicht een beetje kort door de bocht, maar wat misschien een les uit de ervaring dat lifters van geared naar raw eerst zwak zijn omdat ze motor patterns missen en daarna toch in korte tijd epic raw gains maken, dat frequentie en clean form voor raw lifters heel belangrijk zijn. Nu stond dat sowieso niet ter twijfel natuurlijk, maar je zou dan wel kunnen stellen dat 1x per week squatten, wat in sommige raw programma's wel voorkomt, verre van ideaal is. Doe nu ook sinds 6 weken 3-4x per week squats. De gewichten zijn nog licht en ik ga nog lang geen max testen, maar mijn form en ook het algehele gevoel is al een stuk verbeterd. Als ik een jaar verder is ben zijn squats denk een 2e natuur waar ik niet meer bij na hoeft te denken. Die motor patterns erin rammen zijn voor raw lifters heel belangrijk denk ik.
 
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Sanca Saxon

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Mooi stukje, heb geared lifting altijd al boeiend gevonden. Denk niet dat ik het ooit zal doen, ik train nog maar 2 jaar en heb ook totaal geen wedstrijd ambities, daar ben ik veel te slap voor. Daarnaast, geared lifting zie ik eigenlijk nooit bij de jonge dudes op youtube. Beetje uitgestorven tak van de sport denk ik.

Wist trouwens niet dat altijd knee sleeves dragen met trainen slecht is voor de ontwikkeling van je kniegewricht. Draag die dingen altijd, puur omdat mijn knie anders niet stabiel en veilig aanvoelt. Misschien op de lichtere dagen vanaf nu uitlaten en ben benieuwd of ik sterkere knieen krijg daarvan. Zo zal het ook werken met een belt, maar gek genoeg wordt de belt niet eens behandeld in dit stukje.

Wellicht een beetje kort door de bocht, maar wat misschien een les uit de ervaring dat lifters van geared naar raw eerst zwak zijn omdat ze motor patterns missen en daarna toch in korte tijd epic raw gains maken, dat frequentie en clean form voor raw lifters heel belangrijk zijn. Nu stond dat sowieso niet ter twijfel natuurlijk, maar je zou dan wel kunnen stellen dat 1x per week squatten, wat in sommige raw programma's wel voorkomt, verre van ideaal is. Doe nu ook sinds 6 weken 3-4x per week squats. De gewichten zijn nog licht en ik ga nog lang geen max testen, maar mijn form en ook het algehele gevoel is al een stuk verbeterd. Als ik een jaar verder is ben zijn squats denk een 2e natuur waar ik niet meer bij na hoeft te denken. Die motor patterns erin rammen zijn voor raw lifters heel belangrijk denk ik.

Een belt komt niet voor in het stukje omdat een belt nog altijd als raw gerekend word ;)

Ik zou sowieso aanraden eerst raw een stevige basis op te bouwen eer gear nog maar te overwegen, en frequentie hoort sowieso thuis in een goed schema imo, geared of niet
 

rob91

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Een belt komt niet voor in het stukje omdat een belt nog altijd als raw gerekend word ;)

Ik zou sowieso aanraden eerst raw een stevige basis op te bouwen eer gear nog maar te overwegen, en frequentie hoort sowieso thuis in een goed schema imo, geared of niet

Das waar, maar ze behandelen ook knee sleeves en wrist wraps, en die mogen wel met raw toch.
 
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Sanca Saxon

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Stukje over belt toegevoegd

Das waar, maar ze behandelen met knee sleeves en wrist wraps, en die mogen wel met raw toch.

Bepaalde wel, anderen niet. De kneesleeves die ikzelf gebruik (double ply) zijn bv. niet toegelaten in de meeste bonden dacht ik
 

benchMarc

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Gewoon nog enkel raw toestaan en dat hele equipped aan de kant schuiven. Wat is het volgende, een exoskelet?
 

456

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Vind equipped ook maar niks.
 

ijzer

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Exoskelet lijkt me wel wat
 

ijzer

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Exo skelet lijkt me niks btw doe mij maar titanium bones e.d.
 

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